Stanford Graduate School of Business

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"I believe that a successful leader empowers and develops people to make them successful personally and at work. Hiding our emotions makes us look stronger and more confident, but only in our minds. Being honest and vulnerable is a much richer way to lead," shared Guille Spiller (MBA ‘14).

View more student portraits and reflections → http://stnfd.biz/vXaT8 #gsbinthemoment

Stanford GSB faculty, staff, alumni, and guests share their thoughts on mentorship, role models, empowerment, and success:

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"If you hire, train, and mentor correctly, you’ll have someone who is better than you are. If they’re not, you haven’t done your job." –Chef Thomas Keller 
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"Surround yourself with mentors: people who know more than you do and who can make you better at what you do.“ –Journalist and Author Joan Lunden
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The single most important thing an entrepreneur can do is get a mentor. –John Montgomery, Chairman Emeritus of Montgomery & Hansen
Read more #GSBVC insights on Twitter

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"Mentorship must be more about empowering the mentee than about shaping the mentee to be like the mentor.” –Michael Ruderman (MBA ’13) 
Read the full Huffington Post article

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Plan to be a mentor, but be very discriminating and exercise care before agreeing to mentor someone. –Maeve Richard, Director of Stanford GSB’s Career Management Center
Read the full FT.com article

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"Forming a couple of good mentor relationships can help bridge the gap between startup failure & success." –Gabriel Weinberg, CEO & Founder of DuckDuckGo
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The power of mentorship and role models is very important in building the entrepreneurship circuit. –Professor George Foster
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Tip for adding value to others’ lives: Advise. Act as a mentor and share your insights and expertise. –Author Liz Lynch (MBA ’92)
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Rehearsing your body language and getting proper rest are effective tactics for reducing public speaking anxiety and ensuring that you give a memorable presentation. Read on for a round-up of top public speaking tips from Stanford GSB faculty and guest speakers:

1. To manage anxiety, reframe the situation as a conversation rather than a performance. http://stnfd.biz/vJAix 

2. Set your goals at a reasonable level so you can overachieve. http://stnfd.biz/vJAjZ

3. Eat a healthy diet, get proper rest, and exercise to alleviate nervousness. http://stnfd.biz/vJAlX 

4. Diversify your material to keep people’s attention. http://stnfd.biz/vJAom

5. Use analogies to help your audience quickly process and understand new information. http://stnfd.biz/vJApw

6. Add emotion and variety to ensure people remember what they hear and see. http://stnfd.biz/vJAr7 

7. Make sure your content is relevant and easily accessible to your audience. http://stnfd.biz/vJAsS  

8. Add visuals to your slides. When you deliver information verbally, people only remember 10% of it. If you include a picture, retention is 65%. http://stnfd.biz/vJAuC

9. Spend more time rehearsing your body language than your speech. http://stnfd.biz/vJAwf 

10. Include a strong ending. Do you want people to stand when you finish? Or repeat a key takeaway? http://stnfd.biz/vJAxv

11. Practice your presentation beforehand to ensure your body language matches your message. http://stnfd.biz/vJAzh

12. Get to the venue early and imagine your body expanding to fill the room. Own the space. http://stnfd.biz/vJABs 

13. Keep your hand gestures symmetrical when you’re trying to be convincing. http://stnfd.biz/vJACJ 

Leaders who “repot” or change occupations every ten years avoid complacency and are able to find meaningful work that leaves a lasting legacy, believed former Stanford GSB Dean Ernest Arbuckle. Read how shifting your career trajectory from time to time can lead to greater innovation, success, and meaningfulness: http://stnfd.biz/vJ9JS 

PhD student Vivienne Groves reflects on her Stanford GSB experience for our portrait project, [In the Moment]: “Choosing a research team can be even more important than the choice of research topic. Readiness to question ideas, make mistakes, think creatively, and importantly, laugh along the way, are essential.” http://stnfd.biz/vIFWW #gsbinthemoment

What motivates people to reach a goal changes throughout their journey to achieve it, according to new research by Professor Szu-chi Huang. Read how having multiple pathways to success can either encourage or derail people, depending on how far along they are in pursuit of the goal: http://stnfd.biz/vFiKJ

What motivates people to reach a goal changes throughout their journey to achieve it, according to new research by Professor Szu-chi Huang. Read how having multiple pathways to success can either encourage or derail people, depending on how far along they are in pursuit of the goal: http://stnfd.biz/vFiKJ

Is it better to have a career as a specialist or to develop a broad skill set from a range of experiences? Professors John-Paul Ferguson and Sharique Hasan explain why a diverse work history can hurt your chances of promotion: http://stnfd.biz/vEoRd

Is it better to have a career as a specialist or to develop a broad skill set from a range of experiences? Professors John-Paul Ferguson and Sharique Hasan explain why a diverse work history can hurt your chances of promotion: http://stnfd.biz/vEoRd

Build time into your daily routine for reflecting on the big picture of your career and life. Then pursue only what is essential. Gregory McKeown (MBA ’08) explores why “essentialism,” the disciplined pursuit of less, leads to success: http://stnfd.biz/vyX25

Build time into your daily routine for reflecting on the big picture of your career and life. Then pursue only what is essential. Gregory McKeown (MBA ’08) explores why “essentialism,” the disciplined pursuit of less, leads to success: http://stnfd.biz/vyX25

"I see entrepreneurship as a state of mind, and so in that sense, being entrepreneurial is like having superpowers. The superpowers that empower ordinary people to do extraordinary things, and it’s something that lies in every single one of us." –Bowen Pan (MBA ‘14) #gsbinthemoment

View more student portraits and reflections → http://stnfd.biz/vsSKS

Great companies inspire people within the organization to become entrepreneurs. Read more insights from Theresia Gouw’s (MBA ’94) talk on leadership behaviors of successful entrepreneurs: http://stnfd.biz/vr3t1